Blakespotting: July 2016

Ronald Searle: image from A Grain of Sand, 1964.
Ronald Searle: image from A Grain of Sand, 1964.

The monthly roundup of sightings of William Blake in the media.

July began with a delightful tribute to drawings created by Ronald Searle for a movie for UNICEF, entitled A Grain of Sand. The first part of the film includes a narration of Blake’s Auguries of Innocence over Searle’s animation, while the second part features live footage depicting the day in the life of a Tunisian boy. The film doesn’t seem to be available (at least in any easily accessible format) but was made, according to the BFI database, by the UN in 1960 to illustrate the problems of overpopulation and the care of children throughout the world.

In Derry, Northern Ireland, award-winning artist Aislinn Cassidy staged an exhibition of her work, “The Sick Rose“, at the Playhouse Theatre. A science graduate and teacher, Cassidy draws parallels between the diffusion of colour in various substances – including the living form of roses – and draws on the religious, political and social symbolism of Blake’s poem. The exhibition was shown in mid-July at the Playhouse and is due to go on to the North West Regional College in September. Another artist showing work inspired by Blake was Emre Namyeter, whose various lightboxes on display in Istanbul drew upon the famous quotation from The Marriage of Heaven and Hell: “If the doors of perception were cleansed, everything would appear to man as it is, Infinite.”

One of my favourite snippets from July was that the half brother of Barack Obama, Mark Obama Ndesandjo, has released an album entitled Reflections on William Blake. Ndesandjo, who lives in Shenzen, China, and is an accomplished pianist, has made two other albums as well as written a more famous memoir in which he accused Obama Snr of abuse. On his web site, he describes the source of inspiration for his album on Blake as a visit to the Tate, but I have yet to track copies of it down.

Staying with the musical theme, a concert at Chestnut Hill, Philadelphia, included a performance of Louis Andriessen’s Ahania Weeping as part of an evening of music devoted to Jeffrey Dinsmore, a musician who worked with Andriessen and others before his unexpected death in 2014. Meanwhile, in preparation for the Blakefest due to take place in Sussex in September, the music critic Chris Roberts traced some of Blake’s influences on popular music, while U2 confirmed a new 2017 tour and album entitled Songs of Experience.

During July, the photographer Rick Pushinsky published a collectionSongs of Innocence, inspired by the illuminated book of the same name, interweaving photos of found objects with fragments of Blake’s verse. The end of the month saw a one-off performance of Luke Welch’s play, Waiting for Robert, in Bournemouth as a follow up to the Big Blake project that took place this year. This is another one to track down, though according to the synopsis it centres around the struggles of Catherine Blake and William’s patron John [sic] Hayley, chasing the artist for a commission as William is haunted by the spectre of his Ghost of a Flea, which he believes only his dead brother can banish.

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