Blakespotting: August 2016

Unless you’re part of the Donald Trump race relations team, August was probably a quiet month for you. Certainly in the world of Blake news that was the case, even though this is the month that marks Blake’s death in 1827. Despite that fact, any major events seem to be waiting for a much bigger release in September – so much so that the beginning of August was dominated by actor Kit Harington, more famous for his role of “you know nothing” Jon Snow, promoting a new car – the Infiniti Q60 – with words from Blake’s “The Tyger”. You’ll have to wait until 2017 to see whether the Q60 really rivals the BMW 4 Series, but in the meantime you can enjoy Harington’s transfer of poetic appeal to the 400 hp machine in the clip below (and the full version does have nearly the entire poem, which is kind of impressive).

The 12 August marked the anniversary of Blake’s death and, as is traditional, the Blake Society marked his life at the memorial in Bunhill Fields. There will probably be a much more ecstatic celebration of his life in September as part of the Big Blake Project. I’ll be covering the forthcoming “Blakefest” in Sussex in more detail next month which – fingers crossed – will be a major event (and, hopefully, a recurring one). In August, however, it looked as though it was running into some difficulties as the ticketed event – which hopes to attract at least 5,000 visitors – failed to get financial backing from the local council. Another big event which I’ll be returning to in October, but which began to attract a lot of attention online, is the prospective opening of what has been billed as the “world’s largest William Blake gallery“, to be launched by John Windle in San Francisco. What that will actually mean remains to be determined, but Windle’s enthusiasm for Blake is certainly not in doubt.

Rick Pushinsky published his response to Blake’s eighteenth-century collection of poems in August. Songs of Innocence and of Experience: A Study Guide, is a series of beautiful photographs of found and fabricated sculptures, interpreted through the prism of Blake’s imagination. Several of them can be seen at www.pushinsky.com/project/songs-of-innocence/. Another very promising release was Michael Hughes’ novel, The Countenance Divine which, according to Paraic O’Donnell in The Guardian, “is a debut of high ambition that marks the arrival of a considerable talent” in its interweaving of narratives involving a blind Milton in 1666, Jack the Ripper and the Whitechapel murders of 1888, and Blake labouring over his illuminated books in 1790.

Musically, the artist P.J. Sauerteig (aka Slow Dakota) gave a fascinating interview in which he indicated the considerable influence of Blake on his work – not surprising for an album where the opening track deals with a man who submits his song to an angel, only to see it not selected in a contest organised by God. With that lead in, The Ascension of Slow Dakota is now firmly on my must-hear list. U2 has confirmed that the follow up to Songs of Innocence (perhaps one of the most disliked albums of all time because Apple forced iOS users to download it to their devices) will be Songs of Experience. There are few details as yet, other than the new album will be accompanied by a world tour in 2017.

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